Wading in the water

July 8, 2017

<Hola amigo, como está el agua?> <Mojado!> The typical response still makes me smile even after 5 weeks of living in  the community of Tzawata. I pick my way down the rocky bank towards the wide Rio Anzu. We’re lucky today, it didn’t rain yesterday and the river is a clear green-blue. The friend I had greeted is out about twenty feet, swimming against the current. On the rock about 30 feet away, in the middle of the river, 3 children are perched, enjoying the sun. Another woman is washing her clothes down the bank from me, in a rocky area. The clear sound of a sunny day is punctuated by the slap of the shirt she swings persistently against a rock. Another group of children upstream has seen me coming to the river, and is now letting the current bring them down to say hello. I slowly step into the water up to my knees. Despite the heat of the day, the cold still makes me shiver. With a deep breath, I throw myself into the water, taking the plunge all at once.

 (The bridge over Rio Ansu. Photo: Maya Kassutto)

 

The Rio Anzu, and the large, old, metal bridge that connects us to the other side, are two of the most iconic parts of Tzawata’s identity for me. An indigenous community of Kichwa Quijos, Tzawata has a long and harrowing story since the time of colonization. Their ancestors had lived around this river for thousands of years, but upon the arrival of the Spanish they were forced to move up into the mountains and made to work as slaves on their own land. The deed to their land eventually made its way into the hands of a Canadian mining company, where it legally remains to this day. Several years ago, when the company briefly had to leave the country for legal reasons, some of the women of Tzawata Alta, as the mountainous community is called, made the decision to journey down the mountain and take back their ancestral land, forming what is now Tzawata Baja, though we generally refer to it simply as Tzawata. Since then, the community has been engaged in an often ugly struggle against the company and the government branches whose cooperation it has been able to buy. At one point, the police entered and burned down all of the wooden houses. Many community members lost everything they owned, but they refused to move back up the mountain. In a particularly iconic encounter, the police attempted to cross the bridge to forcibly evict the population. The entire community of Tzawata met them on the narrow bridge, blocking the way. Women and children stood at the front, and the men in the back with spears. After a long and tense standoff, the police turned back.

 

After the initial plunge, the icy cold of the water is refreshing. I wade back to the bank for my sack of dirty, smelly clothes and laundry soap. I wet the first shirt and begin to soap it. It’s the same kind of non-biodegradable soap that everyone in the area uses to wash their clothes in the river, but still I feel the familiar twinge of guilt as I watch the suds disappear downstream.

 

The community of Tzawata articulates their struggle in many different ways, but the most common ones include their desire to protect their identity and their land. They still cultivate in the traditional way, with many different crops sharing the land, rather than raising one specific crop to sell, which would objectively be more profitable. They also wish to protect the land, and the river which is home to the fish and so much other life, from the inevitable destruction and pollution brought on by mining. They live out this philosophy on top of a literal gold mine.

 

I make my way through the shirts, and move on to socks. The children splash in the water around me, calling to one another and to me. Some ask me to watch them playing in the river, others just want to talk with me, to have me ask them about themselves. A few run up the bank and throw themselves recklessly off the edge of the bridge, whooping during the 20 foot drop into the water, and surface triumphant, excited for another round.

(Class on the Rio Ansu)

 

The international students, often affectionately referred to as “las gringas,” though not all of us technically fit into that category, are always a huge source of entertainment and attention for the children. That is one of the reasons the community has continued to invite back the “fair trade study abroad” program Rehearsing Change, which brings in international students to take classes alongside community members, around subjects that are useful to the community.  No matter how much we make an effort to put all of us on an even playing field, however, the hegemonic structures of globalization never really disappear. Those of us with a little blue book that has our picture in it have access to privileges and resources that the members of this community will most likely never have access to independent of outside assistance. Those of us with light skin, hair, or eyes have access to cultural resources and preferential treatment, in and outside of Ecuador, which our local counterparts never will. To the best of its ability, Rehearsing Change strives to put these advantages at the disposal of the community, giving them the decision-making power to decide how our presence can be used to further their goals – to use the system’s problems against it. But even on this side of the river, across the bridge, there is no fully escaping a white western hegemony. There can only be a consciousness of it, and an effort to resist.

(Sarah being held up by the group in a representation of power)

 

My washing complete, I slip back into the welcoming water. I swim out a ways, and try to hold my own against the current. I manage it for a few minutes, but then begin to tire and make my way back into the shallower water. My feet find purchase on the sandy bottom of the river. I close my eyes and let myself feel the rush of the chill water against my arms and legs.

 

The Church of the Brethren, my own community, has its own historical connection with resistance against a hegemonic system and a river. The story of the original brethren entering the Eder River to be baptized, undertaking a resistance against what they felt was religious injustice as a community, is one I have grown up with. The church has a rich heritage of resistance to injustice, and living in Tzawata has helped me feel that heritage more present within me. But it has its own ties to racist and colonial systems, ties that here are impossible for me to ignore. I feel a calling in Tzawata, a place very different from my own community, to reconnect with the Brethren idea of radical justice – the life courageously lived in the example of the radical love of Jesus, simply, peacefully, together. It is easy to let my modern, United States, middle-class, materialistic lifestyle make me comfortable, but living on this side of the bridge, where there is only a few hours of generator electricity and no clean running water (the government has done its best to discourage human habitation here), provides the opportunity to see outside of it.

 

 

(Playing theatre games of resistance and adaptation during class.)

 

A couple of small girls swim out to me, and hold on to my back. I swim around with them for a while, and we all laugh when one of them lets go briefly to slip under the water, then pops up again and grabs on tight. They, like all the children here, speak in Spanish to one another.

 

Even as the adults of Tzawata continue a long legal battle against the government and the mining company, their youth are coming of age in a globalized world. One in which speaking Kichwa is looked down upon, and in which the language of power is Spanish, or even English. These youth have their own struggles, that of managing their identity in a changing world, without losing their connection to their culture and community. Many leave to study in big cities, or find work on the other side of the country. Some become ashamed to speak Kichwa, even with their families. Others invest themselves in preserving their language and culture. All have to negotiate a complicated relationship with the community they have grown up in and the hegemonic culture that pervades their world. When I think about growing up as a Brethren youth, I feel a resonance between our experiences. We live in complicated worlds, affected by complicated systems. Like the toxic laundry soap seeping into the beautiful river we hope to protect, there are parts of our identity that conflict with other parts, parts of the culture we live in, breathe in, that are oppressive, and that seek to smother our less-mainstream values.

 

I check my watch, and realize that it is almost time for class. Today we will be working on some of the theater pieces we have been creating in small groups that deal with the struggles faced by Tzawata. Our final presentations are coming up, where our group of local and international students will have the opportunity to share all that we have been working on this semester. I take one last dip to say goodbye to the river, then gather my things and carefully climb back up the rocky bank. The heat of the Amazonian sun on my skin already makes me miss the cool, clear water behind me.

 

The community of Tzawata will continue their struggle and their negotiation of the many cultural pressures they face. While I have had the opportunity to learn alongside them for half a semester, I will be only a tiny part of the story of their struggle, and they of mine. But if there is anything that I have learned from this semester, it is the power of story to empower and transform our identity. And just as we as a class have been working with the story of Tzawata, the story of Tzawata has been calling to my own story. The story of how the church of the Brethren negotiates a changing world is one with significantly lower stakes. We are not at risk of losing lives, of losing thousands of years of culture, of losing a language, or of losing our homes. But our stories are interconnected, because “Peacefully, Simply, Together,” also calls for resistance against a system that seeks to assign everything a dollar value, including life itself. They are interconnected by our shared humanity, and our desire to see a most just world. And for me, they are also now interconnected by human relationships, by friendships and shared experiences.

 

(Our classroom in Tzawata. The river is just 20 meters past the road.)

 

I finish hanging up my clothes, and walk to the roofed area where we have class. One by one, international students and local counterparts trickle in. All around can be heard the sound of laughter at jokes, the giggles of children as they chase one another in and around our group of 13, the barks of excited dogs as they romp around the perimeter. As class starts I feel a twinge of excitement as we split into our groups to rehearse and prepare to re-imagine our stories, to re-imagine our realities, together.

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